Leadership

Reading List: Rushika Fernandopulle

Article · June 20, 2017

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We asked NEJM Catalyst Thought Leaders to tell us the books and articles that have been “game-changers” for them — the ones that have really affected the way they think about health care and their jobs. Here’s what they said. See all entries here.

 

From Rushika Fernandopulle

The New Medical-Industrial Complex, A. Relman, NEJM, October 1980.

The Bell Curve, A. Gawande, The New Yorker, December 2004.

The Cost Conundrum, A. Gawande, The New Yorker, June 2009.

From the article: “Providing health care is like building a house. The task requires experts, expensive equipment and materials, and a huge amount of coördination. Imagine that, instead of paying a contractor to pull a team together and keep them on track, you paid an electrician for every outlet he recommends, a plumber for every faucet, and a carpenter for every cabinet. Would you be surprised if you got a house with a thousand outlets, faucets, and cabinets, at three times the cost you expected, and the whole thing fell apart a couple of years later?”

The Hot Spotters, A. Gawande, The New Yorker, January 2011.

Overkill, A. Gawande, The New Yorker, May 2015.

E-Patients: How They Can Help Us Heal Health Care, T. Ferguson, e-Patients Scholars Working Group white paper, 2007.

Creating Accountable Care Organizations: The Extended Hospital Medical Staff, E. Fisher et al., Health Affairs, 2007.

From the abstract: “Many current policies and approaches to performance measurement and payment reform focus on individual providers; they risk reinforcing the fragmented care and lack of coordination experienced by patients with serious illness. In this paper we show that Medicare beneficiaries receive most of their care from relatively coherent local delivery systems comprising physicians and the hospitals where they work or admit their patients. Efforts to create accountable care organizations at this level—the extended hospital medical staff—deserve consideration as a potential means of improving the quality and lowering the cost of care.”

Primary Care — Will It Survive?, T. Bodenheimer, NEJM, August 2006.

Contributed by: Rushika Fernandopulle, MD, MPP, Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer for Iora Health

 

What’s on your recommended reading list? Comment below!

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