Leadership

Reading List: Dave Chokshi and François de Brantes

Article · May 23, 2017

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We asked NEJM Catalyst Thought Leaders to tell us the books and articles that have been “game-changers” for them — the ones that have really affected the way they think about health care and their jobs. Here’s what they said. See all entries here.

 

From Dave Chokshi

The Ecology of Medical Care, NEJM, K. White et al., November 1961.

From the article: “Current discussions about medical care appear largely concerned with two questions: Is the burgeoning harvest of new knowledge fostered by immense public investment in medical research being delivered effectively to the consumers? Is the available quantity, quality and distribution of contemporary medical care optimum in the opinion of the consumers?”

Sick Individuals and Sick Populations, International Journal of Epidemiology, G. Rose, March 1985.

From the abstract: “Aetiology confronts two distinct issues: the determinants of individual cases, and the determinants of incidence rate. If exposure to a necessary agent is homogeneous within a population, then case/control and cohort methods will fail to detect it: they will only identify markers of susceptibility. The corresponding strategies in control are the ‘high-risk’ approach, which seeks to protect susceptible individuals, and the population approach, which seeks to control the causes of incidence. The two approaches are not usually in competition, but the prior concern should always be to discover and control the causes of incidence.”

Contributed by: Dave Chokshi, MD, MSc, FACP, Chief Population Health Officer, OneCity Health and Senior Assistant Vice President, New York City Health + Hospitals

 

From François de Brantes

To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, Institute of Medicine, November 1999.

From the article: “Health care is a decade or more behind many other high-risk industries in its attention to ensuring basic safety.”

Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, Institute of Medicine, 2001.

From the book: “Today’s health care providers have more research findings and more technology available to them than ever before. Yet recent reports have raised serious doubts about the quality of health care in America.”

Comment from de Brantes: “And the sad part is that these articles continue to be must-reads today because we have yet to fully address the problems that were pointed out and some of the solutions that were outlined.”

Contributed by: François de Brantes, MS, MBA, Vice President and Director, Altarum Institute Center for Payment Innovation

 

What’s on your recommended reading list? Comment below!

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