Patient Engagement

Data Graphic: CMOs and Staff Physicians Lead Patient Engagement Efforts

Infographic · June 5, 2017

CMOs and Physicians Lead Patient Engagement Efforts

Patient Engagement Insights Report. Click To Enlarge.

Who is responsible for ensuring patient engagement happens in health care delivery? NEJM Catalyst Insights Council members say two physician positions should lead: Chief Medical Officers and staff physicians. Health care executives (49%) and clinical leaders (42%) chose the CMO to a higher degree, whereas clinicians responding to the survey selected staff physicians (46%). Nurses and other c-level positions followed well behind.

Read the original Patient Engagement Insights Survey Report: Far to Go to Meaningful Participation.

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