NEJM Catalyst Leadership Board Founder

Thomas H. Lee, MD, MSc

Chief Medical Officer
Press Ganey Associates


Dr. Thomas Lee is Chief Medical Officer of Press Ganey, and an internist and cardiologist, who practices at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He is a Professor of Medicine, part time, at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. Prior to joining Press Ganey, he served as Network President for Partners Healthcare System and CEO for Partners Community HealthCare, Inc., the integrated delivery system founded by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital.

He is a member of the Board of Directors of Geisinger Health System, and Chairman of the Board of Directors for Geisinger Health Plan. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of Health Leads; the Board of Overseers of Weill Cornell Medical College; the Special Medical Advisory Group (SMAG) of the Veterans Administration; and the Panel of Health Advisors of the Congressional Budget Office. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the New England Journal of Medicine.

He is the author of more than 260 academic articles and three books, Chaos and Organization in Health Care, Eugene Braunwald and the Rise of Modern Medicine, and An Epidemic of Empathy in Healthcare.

Named in his honor, the Thomas H. Lee Award for Excellence in Primary Care is given each year to recognize a primary care physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital who meets the needs of his or her patients exceptionally well.

Tom holds a bachelor’s degree in history and science from Harvard College, a medical degree from Cornell University Medical College, and a master’s degree in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. He lives in Milton, Massachusetts, with his wife, Dr. Soheyla Gharib, who is Chief of Medicine at Harvard University Health Services. The couple has three daughters.

Fiona Scott Morton head shot

New Marketplace

We Can’t Spend All Our Money on Health Care

We have to think about how much we want to spend on health according to how much it’s worth to us at the margin.

Providing Free Food as a Treatment for Diabetes Yields Improved Outcomes for Patients While Reducing Cost of Care - Fresh Food Farmacy - Geisinger program for addressing food insecurity in patients with diabetes

Care Redesign

Prescribing Food as a Specialty Drug

Geisinger’s program of providing free food as a treatment for diabetes yields improved outcomes for patients while reducing the cost of care.

Earning Patients' Trust - Back to Kindergarten Panel Clip Still

Care Redesign

Earning Patients’ Trust: Back to Kindergarten

Clinicians and health care organizations need to become better listeners.

Lee B. Sacks Photo

Care Redesign

Halfway to Zero Serious Safety Events

How daily huddles have played a key role in Advocate Health Care’s journey toward zero serious safety events by 2020.

Janice Nevin - Christiana Care Health System

Leadership

The Responsibility of a Big Provider in a Small State

How Christiana Care’s initiatives impact not only those they serve directly, but also the larger community.

Amy Compton-Phillips and Tom Lee head shots

Leadership

The “Give a Darn” Method for Outcomes Measurement

Providence St. Joseph uses the “give a darn” method to deliver value — what makes a difference to patients makes it on the short list.

virtual visits nonvisit health care

Care Redesign

In-Person Health Care as Option B

What if health care were designed so that in-person visits were the second, third, or even last option for meeting routine patient needs, rather than the first?

Amy Merlino and Tom Lee head shots

Leadership

“Humanware” vs. Software

Will those who recall the lost art of paper prescriptions contribute, or gracefully bow out, to technology?

Patient Confidentiality Has to Be Rethought Panel Clip Still

Patient Engagement

Patient Confidentiality Has to Be Rethought

Implementing social incentives and peer support could face opposition over concerns about patient confidentiality. How can we overcome that?

Active Learning Opportunities for Health Care Leadership Panel Clip Still

Leadership

Does Every Health Care Leader Need an MBA?

In health care leadership training, behavior and active day-to-day learning opportunities are just as important as values.

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